Human Experience Dynamics Part 1:

The nature of experience is not dictated by the moments of perception that initiate it, but rather the moments of integration and export aft. The mental processing and manipulation of these moments manifest an experience. Only when the person recollects memories and analyses them can a threshold be met that turns vague perceptions in memory into experience. From this point the experience is inherently dynamic, whether ephemeral or evolving. It may deteriorate from neglect, be intentionally reconstrued (for depth, bias, or affect), unconsciously or latently modified, be recollected often by habit or trigger, incorporate new information or perspectives (other’s accounts, mood-based effects, relabeling or new purpose), be spliced with other memory, adapt to narration or detail preference, or in other myriad ways be reproduced by implicit or explicit cognitive and neurological fluctuations in the associated information subsystems.
The most basic physicality of human experience lies in the neural reality and the behavior of cells in congregation. This extrapolates to all scales of the brain from chemical to neural regions and specialized systems, networking and modulation, sensation, perception, worldview, physiological states (acute or chronic), context as social and cultural or non- human, pathology and well-being, and even quantum biological factors. This leaves dynamic flux as norm and consistency as innately impossible.
With this casual and effective dynamo in mind, Part 2 will be an attempt to refine and define critical components of human experience. Regardless of subjective or objective limits, this will be a naive highlighting based on social and physical science insights of my own personal experience with experience.

Stay tuned! Part 2 sneak peak: Experience is built from explicit, latent, and unconscious contrivations of memories via interpretation, narration, purpose, and definition of agency. These ideas will be broken down and exemplified thoroughly.

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